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Nutritional effect of freshwater Chlorella on growth of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis

  • K. Hirayama
  • I. Maruyama
  • T. Maeda
Conference paper
Part of the Developments in Hydrobiology book series (DIHY, volume 52)

Abstract

Mass production of Brachionus plicatilis is usually accomplished by feeding so-called marine Chlorella (Nannochloropsis oculata) to the rotifers in marine fish hatcheries. If the marine Chlorella are in short supply, baker’s yeast is usually used as a supplementary food. Recently, a condensed suspension of freshwater Chlorella (Chlorella vulgaris, k-22) was commercially developed as another supplementary food. We have evaluated the dietary value of this freshwater Chlorella for growth of the rotifer by means of individual and batch cultures. Rotifers cultured with the freshwater Chlorella suspension under almost bacteria-free conditions, showed very suppressed growth. However if the Chlorella was supplemented with vitamin B12 by adding the vitamin solution into the suspension or by culturing the Chlorella in a medium containing vitamin B12, the nutritional value of freshwater Chlorella was greatly improved and almost at the same level as that of marine Chlorella. Condensed Chlorella may therefore be effective as a supplementary food if vitamin B12 is supplied.

Key words

Freshwater Chlorella nutritional effect Brachionus plicatilis Vitamin B12 supplementary food 

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Hirayama
    • 1
  • I. Maruyama
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. Maeda
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of Marine Science and EngineeringNagasaki University, NagasakiNagasakiJapan
  2. 2.Chlorella Industry Co., Ltd.Chikugo, FukuokaJapan

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