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The development of Hexarthra spp. in a shallow alkaline lake

  • Alois Herzig
  • Walter Koste
Part of the Developments in Hydrobiology book series (DIHY, volume 52)

Abstract

In Neusiedler See, a shallow alkaline lake with fluctuating water level and salinity, four species of Hexarthra occur: H. mira, H.fennica, H.jenkinae (occasional) and H.polyodonta. The analysis of long-term data reveals a general phenological pattern which does not change from year to year. They first occur in May, develop a maximum in June/July, sometimes a second one in August/September and disappear in October. But the species succession is different in the various years, occasionally only one species (H. mira or H. polyodonta) being present. There is a fairly consistent relation between the chemical conditions and the prevalent species; an increase in salinity favours the development of H.polyodonta. Low temperature and wind generated suspended particles have a negative influence on the development of the Hexarthra populations. Smaller populations of Hexarthra are in a relation to the occurrence of Leptodora indicating predation pressure of the latter species. In Neusiedler See the Hexarthra populations seem to be controlled to a great extent by abiotic factors, but predation by Leptodora and most probably by young fish seems to play an important role too.

Key words

Hexarthra Salinity Alkalinity wind action temperature 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alois Herzig
    • 1
  • Walter Koste
    • 1
  1. 1.Biologische Station Neusiedler See, A-7142 IllmitzQuakenbrückGermany

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