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Fathers, Fathering, and Fatherhood Across Cultures

  • Rudy Ray SewardEmail author
  • Leslie Stanley-Stevens
Chapter
Part of the Science Across Cultures: The History of Non-Western Science book series (SACH, volume 7)

Abstract

This chapter reviews the development and current status of fathering research worldwide with a focus on the cultural context of fatherhood. Parenting research in large-scale societies initially focused on mothers and when fathers were studied they typically were White, North American, and middle-class. Currently evidence is available from cultures in every continent but the coverage within and between nations varies widely. Uneven coverage makes cross-cultural comparisons difficult but when possible they often challenge previous assumptions made in Western cultures. Approaches to fathering vary widely from a primary concern with being a disciplinarian and provider to those focusing on nurturing child care with many possible types and combinations in between. Non-Western fathering varies more dramatically than fathering practices in the Western world. However, almost all research on fathers across cultures since 1990 suggests some change in the direction of greater involvement by fathers. Cultures with more involved fathers tend to be more peaceful and have more gender equality. Comparative studies are needed within regions, within a given culture, and that focus on shared conditions like emigration.

Keywords

Biological Father Father Involvement Earth Father Korean Father Dyadic Father 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of North TexasDentonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Social SciencesTarleton State UniversityStephenvilleUSA

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