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The Evolving Challenges of Modern-Day Parenthood in Singapore

  • Karen Mui-Teng QuekEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Science Across Cultures: The History of Non-Western Science book series (SACH, volume 7)

Abstract

The Singapore family is strong and in a healthy state but faces potential tensions between work-family balances and societal pressures. Most Singaporeans still emphasize strong family ties and cherish family values, desiring to be parents and have more children. However the gap between reality and ideals persists. Competing priorities and responsibilities between motherhood, fatherhood and jobs pose tough challenges for parents to ensure that family commitments remain as the main anchor. My study on contemporary Singaporean couples with young children indicated that when confronted with how to value dual careers, children, and marital relationships within a changing social structure, a new model of parenthood and couple relationship is being demonstrated by most of them, even though they expressed traditional gender ideals.

Keywords

Private Tutor Father Involvement Childcare Center Shared Parenting Parenting Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Couple and Family Therapy Program, California School of Professional PsychologyAlliant International UniversityIrvineUSA

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