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Some Demographic Events and Characteristics Analysis

  • Farhat Yusuf
  • Jo. M. Martins
  • David A. Swanson
Chapter
  • 3.1k Downloads

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with some of what have been designated as achieved characteristics of populations such as marital status, family and household formation, education and training and labour force participation. It discusses some of the issues related to marital status and its evolving nature and social acceptance. It presents examples of marriage and divorce measures. It discusses concepts and definitions of households and families, in their many forms, and gives examples of related measures. It proceeds to examine question of literacy, participation in education such as enrolment, retention and attainment, and gives examples of their measurement. Then, it deals with concepts and definitions of participation in the labour force, employment and unemployment and their measurement, including job creation, labour force growth, hirings and separations. Relevant measurements are considered and examples given. In addition, the classification of occupations and the industry of employment are also discussed.

Keywords

Labour Force Labour Force Participation Rate Marriage Rate Enrolment Ratio Headship Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Farhat Yusuf
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jo. M. Martins
    • 2
  • David A. Swanson
    • 3
  1. 1.Menzies Centre for Health Policy Sydney School of Public HealthThe University of SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Marketing and Management Faculty of Business and EconomicsMacquarie UniversityNorth RydeAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Sociology College of Humanities, Arts and Social SciencesUniversity of California RiversideRiversideUSA

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