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Implementing the EQF: English as Distinct from Continental Bricklaying Qualifications

  • Michaela BrockmannEmail author
  • Linda Clarke
  • Christopher Winch
Chapter
Part of the Technical and Vocational Education and Training: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (TVET, volume 18)

Abstract

Potential difficulties confront the implementation of the European Qualification Framework (EQF) at both sectoral and occupational levels, as evident, for example, within the construction sector in terms of the recognition of bricklaying qualifications. The success of the EQF may depend on the development of cross-national, cross-sectoral and cross-occupational zones of mutual trust (ZMTs), establishing arrangements for recognising equivalences in terms of mutual knowledge and methods of working. This chapter focuses in particular on disparities between the English and continental bricklaying qualifications in order to identify some of the difficulties with which implementation of the EQF will be confronted. In England, the coexistence of two systems can be discerned: a traditional trade-based and an occupational one struggling to emerge and develop. This chapter discusses the implications of these differences in the level, scope and nature of bricklaying qualifications in Europe for the EQF.

Keywords

Labour Market European Union Labour Market Entry Related Occupation Continental Country 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michaela Brockmann
    • 1
    Email author
  • Linda Clarke
    • 1
  • Christopher Winch
    • 2
  1. 1.Westminster Business SchoolUniversity of WestminsterLondonUK
  2. 2.King’s CollegeLondonUK

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