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Response Rates and Survival Times for Dogs with Lymphoma Treated with the University of Wisconsin-Madison Chemotherapy Protocol

  • Hae-Won JungEmail author
  • Byeong-Teck Kang
  • Kyu-Woan Cho
  • Joon-Hyeok Jeon
  • Hee-Chun Lee
  • Jong-Hyun Moon
  • Hyo-Mi Jang
  • Ji-Hyun Kim
  • Dong-In Jung
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 179)

Abstract

Medical records of 10 dogs with newly diagnosed lymphoma between February 2009 and October 2011 were reviewed in this study. All dogs were treated with the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UWM) chemotherapy protocol. For all dogs, overall median survival time was 277 days (ranged from 9 to 1094 days). The overall response rate of dogs with lymphoma to treat the UWM chemotherapy protocol was 80%; 4 of the 10 (40%) dogs had a complete remission, 4 of the 10 (40%) dogs had a partial remission, and 2 of the 10 (20%) dogs had a no response. This study demonstrates that the clinical findings, diagnostic examination results, response to chemotherapy in canine lymphoma cases. The dog is structurally and functionally very similar to the human. Thus, we hope that this study could help to develop the canine hematopoietic tumor model.

Keywords

lymphoma dog 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hae-Won Jung
    • 1
    Email author
  • Byeong-Teck Kang
    • 2
  • Kyu-Woan Cho
    • 1
  • Joon-Hyeok Jeon
    • 1
  • Hee-Chun Lee
    • 1
  • Jong-Hyun Moon
    • 1
  • Hyo-Mi Jang
    • 1
  • Ji-Hyun Kim
    • 1
  • Dong-In Jung
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Institute of Life SciencesGyeongsang National UniversityJinjuSouth Korea
  2. 2.Laboratory of Veterinary Dermatology and Neurology, College of Veterinary MedicineChungbuk National UniversityCheongjuSouth Korea

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