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Management and Restoration – Applying Best Practice

  • J. Patrick Doody
Chapter
Part of the Coastal Research Library book series (COASTALRL, volume 4)

Abstract

This chapter brings together information on the states and values, and the analysis of trends and trade-offs for the beach/foredune ( Chaps. 4 and  6) and inland vegetated sand dunes ( Chaps. 5 and  7). Two simple State Evaluation Models (Sects. 6.2.4 and 7.2.6) provide a means of visualising the relationship between the states. Based on the current ‘value’ of each state it is possible to identify if the habitat at each location is in the ‘desired state’ or not. If intervention is required, this chapter gives details of some of the methods used in habitat management and restoration. These include taking action to control erosion, manipulate grazing regimes or restore and re-create sand dune systems.

Keywords

Sand Dune National Nature Reserve Dune Slack Beach Nourishment Dune Vegetation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Patrick Doody
    • 1
  1. 1.National Coastal ConsultantsBrampton, HuntingdonUK

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