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Effects of Cigarette Smoke and Chronic Hypoxia on Ventilation in Guinea Pigs. Clinical Significance

  • Elena Olea
  • Elisabet Ferrer
  • Jesus Prieto-Lloret
  • Carmen Gonzalez-Martin
  • Victoria Vega-Agapito
  • Elvira Gonzalez-Obeso
  • Teresa Agapito
  • Victor Peinado
  • Ana Obeso
  • Joan Albert Barbera
  • Constancio GonzalezEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 758)

Abstract

Ventilatory effects of chronic cigarette smoke (CS) alone or associated to chronic hypoxia (CH), as frequently occurs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), remain unknown. We have addressed this problem using whole-body plethysmography in guinea-pigs, common models to study harmful effects of CS on the respiratory system. Breathing frequencies (Bf) in control (2–5 months old) guinea pigs is 90–100 breaths/min, their tidal volume (TV) increased with age but lagged behind body weight gain and, as consequence, their minute volume (MV)/Kg decreased with age. MV did not change by acutely breathing 10% O2 but doubled while breathing 5% CO2 in air. Exposure to chronic sustained hypoxia (15 days, 12% O2, CH) did not elicit ventilatory acclimatization nor adaptation. These findings confirm the unresponsiveness of the guinea pig CB to hypoxia. Exposure to CS (3 months) increased Bf and MV but association with CH blunted CS effects. We conclude that CS and CH association accelerates CS-induced respiratory system damage leading to a hypoventilation that can worsen the ongoing COPD process.

Keywords

Guinea pig Ventilation Tobacco Hypoxia Carotid body. 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We want to thank Mª de los Llanos Bravo and Elena Gonzalez for technical assistance. The work was supported by the “Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación of Spain”(grant number BFU2007-61848) and by the “Instituto Carlos III”(grant number CIBER CB06/06/0050).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elena Olea
    • 1
    • 2
  • Elisabet Ferrer
    • 3
  • Jesus Prieto-Lloret
    • 1
    • 2
  • Carmen Gonzalez-Martin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Victoria Vega-Agapito
    • 1
    • 2
  • Elvira Gonzalez-Obeso
    • 1
    • 2
  • Teresa Agapito
    • 1
    • 2
  • Victor Peinado
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ana Obeso
    • 1
    • 2
  • Joan Albert Barbera
    • 2
    • 3
  • Constancio Gonzalez
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and PhysiologyIBGM Universidad de Valladolid and CSICValladolidSpain
  2. 2.Ciber de Enfermedades RespiratoriasValladolidSpain
  3. 3.Department of Pulmonary Medicine Hospital Clínic-Institut d′Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS)Universitat de BarcelonaValladolidSpain

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