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Somatic Cell Reprogramming: Role of Homeodomain Protein Nanog

  • Thorold W. Theunissen
  • José C. R. SilvaEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells book series (STEM, volume 6)

Abstract

The molecular mechanisms of somatic cell reprogramming, including the role of endogenous determinants, remain poorly understood. Here we review the role of the homeodomain protein Nanog during induced pluripotency. Nanog is not required to trigger somatic cell reprogramming. Instead, Nanog is specifically required to finalize reprogramming in chemically defined conditions that support naive pluripotency. This closely resembles mouse embryogenesis, where Nanog controls the emergence of the naive pluripotent epiblast from a transcriptional network primed by other factors, including Oct4. Constitutive expression of Nanog enhances reprogramming and enables induced pluripotency in conditions that normally do not support the self-renewal of embryonic stem cells. We discuss the proposed mechanisms leading to the transcriptional activation of Nanog and its mode of action during reprogramming.

Keywords

Embryonic Stem Cell Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Human Embryonic Stem Cell Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Inner Cell Mass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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