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Low Temperature Atmospheric Argon Plasma: Diagnostics and Medical Applications

  • Svetlana Ermolaeva
  • Oleg Petrov
  • Nailya Zigangirova
  • Mikhail Vasiliev
  • Elena Sysolyatina
  • Sergei Antipov
  • Maxim Alyapyshev
  • Natalia Kolkova
  • Andrei Mukhachev
  • Boris Naroditsky
  • Tetsuji Shimizu
  • Anatoly Grigoriev
  • Gregor Morfill
  • Vladimir Fortov
  • Alexander Gintsburg
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series A: Chemistry and Biology book series (NAPSA)

Abstract

This study was devoted to diagnostic of low temperature plasma produced by microwave generator and investigation of its bactericidal effect against bacteria in biofilms and within eukaryotic cells. The profile of gas temperature near the torch outlet was measured. The spectrum in a wide range of wavelengths was derived by the method of optical emission spec-troscopy. Probe measurements of the floating potential of plasma were car-ried out. The estimation and adaptation of parameters of plasma flow (tem-perature, velocity, ion number density) according to medico-technical requirements were produced. The model of immersed surface-associated biofilms formed by Gram-negative bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia, and Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, was used to assess bactericidal effects of plasma treatment. Reduction in the concentration of live bacteria in biofilms treated with plasma for 5 min was demonstrated by measuring Live/Dead fluorescent labeling and using direct plating. The intracellular infection model with the pathogenic bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis, was used to study the efficacy of microwave argon plasma against intracellular parasites. A 2 min plasma treatment of mouse cells infected with C. trachomatis reduced infectious bacteria by a factor of 2×106. Plasma treatment diminished the number of viable host cells by about 20%. When the samples were covered with MgF2 glass to obstruct active particles and UV alone was applied, the bactericidal effect was re-duced by 5×104 fold compared to the whole plasma.

Keywords

Plasma Treatment Plasma Source Chlamydia Trachomatis Plasma Torch Argon Plasma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank ADTEC Plasma Technology Co. Ltd., and in particular Mr. Urayama for their part in the development of the MicroPlaSter device. We highly appreciate the help of BioMedes Ltd. in manuscript preparation. The work was supported by Russian Ministry of Education and Science (grants 02.740.11.0310 and 14.740.11.0118) and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant 10-02-01428).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Svetlana Ermolaeva
    • 1
  • Oleg Petrov
    • 2
  • Nailya Zigangirova
    • 1
  • Mikhail Vasiliev
    • 2
  • Elena Sysolyatina
    • 1
  • Sergei Antipov
    • 2
  • Maxim Alyapyshev
    • 2
  • Natalia Kolkova
    • 1
  • Andrei Mukhachev
    • 1
  • Boris Naroditsky
    • 1
  • Tetsuji Shimizu
    • 3
  • Anatoly Grigoriev
    • 4
  • Gregor Morfill
    • 3
  • Vladimir Fortov
    • 2
  • Alexander Gintsburg
    • 1
  1. 1.Gamaleya Institute of Epidemiology and MicrobiologyMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Joint Institute of High Temperatures RASMoscowRussia
  3. 3.Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial PhysicsMunichGermany
  4. 4.Institute of Biomedical Problems RASMoscowRussia

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