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A Reconstruction of the Taphonomic History of GBY

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Part of the Vertebrate Paleobiology and Paleoanthropology book series (VERT)

Abstract

This chapter aims to reconstruct the taphonomic processes that influenced the assemblages of Layers V-5 and V-6, as well as to identify the taphonomic role of particular agents that may have influenced the fossil bones and the stone artifacts deposited in these layers, and considers these results vis-à-vis other data, both from the site and experimental.

Keywords

Stone Artifact Taphonomic Process Lithic Assemblage Lithic Artifact Bone Assemblage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Earth Sciences and National Natural History Collections, Institute of Archaeology, The Hebrew University of JerusalemGivat Ram JerusalemIsrael
  2. 2.Palaeolithic Research UnitRömisch-Germanisches ZentralmuseumNeuwiedGermany
  3. 3.Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Institute for Pre- and Protohistoric ArchaeologyNeuwiedGermany
  4. 4.Institute of Archaeology, The Hebrew University of JerusalemMt. Scopus JerusalemIsrael

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