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The Meaning of Poverty: Conceptual Issues in Small-Scale Fisheries Research

  • Svein JentoftEmail author
  • Georges Midré
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter synthesizes the conceptual issues and arguments advanced in the 15 case studies presented in this volume. It also relates the arguments and findings to major issues in poverty research and debates, and to the literature on small-scale fisheries and poverty. Moreover, the chapter discusses the many dimensions of poverty, and how poverty and vulnerability undermine the role of small-scale fisheries as providers of sustainable livelihoods, food security, and economic development. At the same time, it recognizes that poverty, vulnerability, and development are essentially “wicked” problems, difficult to define and solve, partly because they have no simple technical solution. This has important policy and governance implications; therefore listening to the poor and involving them in decision-making is essential.

Keywords

Action Space Social Exclusion Poor People Poverty Alleviation Capability Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Norwegian College of Fishery ScienceUniversity of TromsøTromsøNorway
  2. 2.Department of Sociology, Political Science and Community PlanningUniversity of TromsøTromsøNorway

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