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Shallow Foundations

  • Milutin SrbulovEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the Geotechnical, Geological, and Earthquake Engineering book series (GGEE, volume 20)

Abstract

Shallow foundations transfer loads from structures into soil via the foundation undersides mainly and could be of pad, strip and raft shape. They are used when ground is firm or when loads are relatively small. The factors of safety for shallow foundations in static condition are usually high so that their performance in cyclic condition is usually satisfactory except in liquefiable and soft/loose soil in which case the build up of excess pore water pressure and reduction of soil strength to a small residual value could cause foundation failure and loss of serviceability as described in Section 9.5. Modern shallow foundations are made of (reinforced) concrete although older types were made of brick work or stone masonry, Fig. 9.1.

Keywords

Ground Motion Peak Ground Acceleration Foundation Vibration Excess Pore Water Pressure Standard Penetration Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UK

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