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Typical Ground Motions, Recording, Ground Investigations and Testing

  • Milutin SrbulovEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Geotechnical, Geological, and Earthquake Engineering book series (GGEE, volume 20)

Abstract

Ground motions are recorded (a) for quantitative assessments of their effects on structures, processes and people, (b) for checking of predicted values, (c) when required by legislations and in other cases.

Keywords

Ground Motion Wave Velocity Rayleigh Wave Triaxial Test Ground Vibration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UK

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