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Introduction

  • Milutin SrbulovEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the Geotechnical, Geological, and Earthquake Engineering book series (GGEE, volume 20)

Abstract

Engineers prefer to use codes for design of structures subjected to cyclic and dynamic loads. However, design codes are very brief concerning the seismic response of underground structures (foundations, tunnels, pipelines) and when they provide recommendations on the best practice these recommendations are limited to usual types of structures (buildings) and ground conditions. The users of British Standards are aware that compliance with them does not necessarily confer immunity from relevant statutory and legal requirements. Often engineers need to seek advice and help from specialists in soil dynamics. Because the issues in soil dynamics are rather complex, the specialist use simple considerations and methods not least for checking of the results of more complex analyses. Hence, engineers can use simple considerations and methods for assessment of severity of a problem before engaging specialists for solution of the problem.

Keywords

Peak Particle Velocity Attenuation Relationship Cyclic Stress Ratio Surface Wave Magnitude Peak Horizontal Acceleration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UK

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