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Fertility and Women’s Labour Supply: Theoretical Considerations

  • Anna Matysiak
Chapter
Part of the European Studies of Population book series (ESPO, volume 17)

Abstract

In Chapter 2 we demonstrated the complexity of the interdependencies between fertility and women’s labour supply at the macro-level. The data presented suggest that the interrelationship may depend on the incompatibilities between fertility and women’s work which varies across countries, but also on some other country-specific factors. If the mechanism underlying fertility and labour market behaviours is to be understood, the variables governing their relationship, including the intensity of the conflict between the two activities, need to be better explored.

Keywords

Labour Market Income Effect Price Effect Parental Leave Female Labour Force Participation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Warsaw School of EconomicsInstitute of Statistics and DemographyWarsawPoland

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