Interdisciplinary Women’s Health Research and Career Development

Chapter
Part of the International Library of Ethics, Law, and the New Medicine book series (LIME, volume 48)

Abstract

Since the 1970s, many leaders in biomedical research have warned about a looming national shortage of new physician investigators but evidence, especially for Women’s Health, has been largely indirect or anecdotal. This chapter discusses the number of junior physician investigators, in either patient-oriented or basic science research, who are present in departments and who are needed to maintain a research mission.

Keywords

Biomedical research careers Interdisciplinary research Physician scientists Women’s health research Sex differences research 

Notes

Acknowledgements

For their valuable assistance in the preparation of this manuscript: Janine A. Clayton, M.D., Deputy Director, ORWH; Nida H. Corry, Ph.D., AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow, ORWH; Joslyn Yudenfreund Kravitz, Ph.D., Special Assistant to the Director, ORWH; and Joan Davis Nagel, M.D., M.P.H., Director of Interdisciplinary Research Programs, ORWH.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Office of Research on Women’s Health, Department of Health and Human ServicesNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Consultant to Office of Research on Women’s Health, formerly Chief of Women’s ProgramsNational Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of HealthPotomacUSA

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