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China’s Universities, Cross-Border Education, and Dialogue among Civilizations

  • Ruth Hayhoe
  • Jian Liu
Part of the CERC Studies in Comparative Education book series (CERC, volume 27)

Abstract

In Chapter 3 of this book, William Cummings noted the emphasis on human resources and on economic and social priorities that have characterized the development states of East Asia. He then suggested that these states are now moving beyond a century-long strategy of “catching up” with Western science and on to new possibilities of knowledge creation, especially in the sciences and technology.

Keywords

High Education International Student Academic Freedom Chinese Student Cultural Revolution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Comparative Education Research Centre 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of TorontoTorontoUSA

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