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Gross National Happiness: A Gift from Bhutan to the World

  • George W. BurnsEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

“Gross National Happiness is more important than Gross National Product.” These now famous words by the fourth king of Bhutan, Jigme Singye Wangchuck, have formed the basis for the country’s political philosophy, have been written into its democratic constitution, are measured by a series of established indicators, and have attracted the interest of multidisciplinary scientists.

Keywords

Gross Domestic Product Good Governance Gross National Product National Happiness Happiness Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hypnotherapy Centre, Milton H. Erickson InstituteWestern AustraliaAustralia

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