Advertisement

Observed Climate Change in Croatia and Its Impact on the Hydrology of Lowlands

  • Boris VrbekEmail author
  • Ivan Pilaš
  • Nikola Pernar
Chapter
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 212)

Abstract

The lowland forests of South-eastern Europe present the remains of large forest areas, strongly influenced by periodic flooding and shallow groundwater tables. Their natural hydrologic regime was throughout history continuously exposed to various negative influences such as intensive forest exploitation and hydro-technical activities Nowadays there are more indices of regional runaway of climate change, which have caused a lowering trend in the groundwater tables and more intense droughts. To attenuate past, present and future negative impacts on the hydrology of lowlands, the possibilities of water table management were assessed. In this study, the procedure of estimation of the historic state of waterlogging based on a comparison of relict morphological indicators of hydromorphic soils and the present state of groundwater tables were developed. According to this, major influences on groundwater tables such as hydro-technical objects and disturbances of forest stand structure were assessed.

Keywords

Groundwater Table Gypsy Moth Lowland Forest Soil Water Balance Hydromorphic Soil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Blavet D, Mathe E, Leprun JC (1999) Relations between soil color and water logging duration in representative hillside of the West African granito-gneisic bedrock. Catena 39:187–210CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Čermak J, Prax A (2001) Water balance of a Southern Moravian floodplain forest under natural and modified soil water regimes and its ecological consequences. Ann For Sci 58:15–29CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Čermak J, Ulehla J, Kučera J, Penka M (1982) Sap flow rate and transpiration dynamics in the full-grown Oak (Quercus robur L.) in floodplain forest exposed to seasonal floods as related to potential evapotranspiration and tree dimensions. Biol Plantarum 24:446–460CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. European Environment Agency (2006) European forest types. Technical report No 9/2006. http://www.eea.europa.eu/publications/technical_report_2006_9. Accessed 15 June 2009
  5. Fiedler S, Sommer M (2004) Water and redox conditions in wetland soils – their influence on pedogenic oxides and morphology. Soil Sci Soc Am J 68:326–335CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Fischer R, Lorenz M, Köhl M, Becher G, Granke O, Christou A (2008) The condition of forests in Europe. Institute for world forestry Executive Report. http://www.icp-forests.org/pdf/ER2008.pdf. Accessed 18 June 2009
  7. He X, Vepraskas MJ, Lindbo DL, Skaggs RW (2003) A method to predict soil saturation frequency and duration from soil color. Soil Sci Soc Am J 67:961–969CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Hurt GW, Carlisle VW (2001) Delineating hydric soils. In: Richardson JL, Vepraskas MJ (eds) Wetland soils, genesis, hydrology, landscapes, and classification. CRC Press LLC, Boca Raton, FLGoogle Scholar
  9. International Union of Soil Sciences Working Group WRB. (2006) World reference base for soil resources 2006. World Soil Resources Reports No. 103. FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  10. Kellomäki S, Leinonen S (2005) Final Report of the Project “Silvicultural Response Strategies to Climatic Change in Management of European Forests” funded by the European Union under the Contract EVK2-2000-00723 (SilviStrat) http://www.efi.int/files/attachments/projects/silvistrat Accessed 10 April 2005
  11. Krejči V, Vrbek B (1995) Distribution of precipitation in the community of pedunculate oak and common hornbeam at the area of Česma basin influenced by the age and species of trees. Šumarski List 9–10:317–322Google Scholar
  12. Mayer B (1995) Scope and meaning of the ground and surface water monitoring for the lowland forests in Croatia. Šumarski List 11–12:383–389Google Scholar
  13. Neteler M, Mitasova H (2003) Open source GIS: a GRASS GIS approach. Kluwer, Dordrecht, The NetherlandsGoogle Scholar
  14. Pernek M, Pilaš I (2005) Gradations of gypsy moth – Lymantria dispar L. (Lep., Lymantriidae) in Croatia. Šumarski List 5–6:263–270Google Scholar
  15. Pernek M, Pilaš I, Vrbek B, Benko M, Hrašovec B, Milković J (2008) Forecasting the impact of the Gypsy moth on lowland hardwood forests by analyzing the cyclical pattern of population and climate data series. For Ecol Manag 255(5–6):1740–1748CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Pietsch AS, Hasenauer H, Kučera J, Čermak J (2003) Modeling effects of hydrological changes on the carbon and nitrogen balance of oak in floodplains. Tree Physiol 23:735–746PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Pilaš I (2008) The climate change and hydrology of lowland forests in Croatia. Climate Change III in South-Eastern European Countries: Causes, Impacts, Solutions, 18th and 19th September 2008, Graz, Austria, Joanneum Research. http://www.joanneum.at/climate/Workshop%20Graz/Presentations.html Accessed 5 May 2009
  18. Pilaš I, Vrbek B, Medak D (2005) Application of groundwater monitoring in management of pedunculate oak forests in Croatia. Pp. 275–284. In: Afgan NH, Bogdan Ž, Duić N, Guzović Z (eds) Sustainable development of energy, water and environment systems, vol 2. Faculty of mechanical engineering and naval architecture, ZagrebGoogle Scholar
  19. Pilaš I, Lukić N, Vrbek B, Dubravac T, Roth V (2007) The effect of groundwater decrease on short and long term variations of radial growth and dieback of mature pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) stand. Ekol Bratisl 26(2):122–131Google Scholar
  20. Prpić B (1996) Degradation of pedunculate oak forests. In: Moguš M, Serdarušić A (eds) Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) in Croatia. Croatian academy of science and art, Zagreb, pp 459–463Google Scholar
  21. Prpić B, Milković I (2005) The range of floodplain forests today and in the past, Monography: floodplain forests in Croatia. Academia of forest sciences, Zagreb city, city office for agriculture and forestry, Zagreb, pp 37–39Google Scholar
  22. Rauš Đ, Seletković Z, Mayer B, Medvedović J, Raguž D (1996) Forest associations and synecological condition of pedunculate oak. In: Moguš M, Serdarušić A (eds) Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) in Croatia. Croatian Academy of Science and Art, Zagreb, pp 385–408Google Scholar
  23. Richardson JL, Arndt JL, Montgomery JL (2001) Hydrology of wetland and related soils. In: Richardson JL, Vepraskas MJ (eds) Wetland soils, genesis, hydrology, landscapes, and classification. CRC Press LLC, Boca Raton, FLGoogle Scholar
  24. Richardson JL, Daniels RB (1993) Stratigraphic and hydraulic influences on soil color development. In: Bingham JM, Ciolkosz EJ (eds) Soil color. Special Publication no. 31. Soil Science Society of America, Madison, WIGoogle Scholar
  25. Roša D, Pilaš I, Roša J, Vršnak B, Maričić D, Hržina D (2010) The relationship between solar activity and soil water balance. Sun and Geosphere (in press)Google Scholar
  26. Schulze DG, Nagel JL, Van Scoyoc GE, Henderson TL, Baumgardner MF (1993) Significance of organic matter in determining soil colors. In: Bingham JM, Ciolkosz EJ (eds) Soil color. Special Publication no. 31. Soil Science Society of America, Madison, WIGoogle Scholar
  27. Schwertmann U (1993) Relations between iron oxides. In: Bingham JM, Ciolkosz EJ (eds) Soil color Special Publication no 31. Soil Science Society of America, Madison, WIGoogle Scholar
  28. Schwertmann U, Fanning DS (1976) Iron-manganese concentrations in hydrosequence of soils in loess in Bavaria. Soil Sci Soc Am J 41:1013–1018CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Tandarich JP, Elledge AL (1996) Determining the extent of presettlement wetlands from hydric soil acreages: a comparison of SSURGO and STATSGO estimates. Hey & Associates, Inc, Chicago, ILGoogle Scholar
  30. Thomas FM (2008) Recent advances in cause-effect research on oak decline in Europe. CAB Rev: Perspect Agric Vet Sci Nutr Nat Resour 37(3):1–12Google Scholar
  31. UNDP (2008) A Climate for Change. Climate change and its impacts on society and economy of Croatia. Human Development Report Croatia 2008. United Nations Development Programme http://www.undp.hr/show.jsp?page=103395. Accessed 7 April 2009
  32. Vašiček F (1985) Natural conditions of floodplain forests. In: Penka M, Vyskot M, Klimo E, Vašiček F (eds) Developments in agricultural and managed-forest ecology 15A. Floodplain forest ecosystem. I. Before water management measures. Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, pp 13–29Google Scholar
  33. Vepraskas MJ (2001) Morphological features of seasonally reduced soils. In: Richardson JL, Vepraskas MJ (eds) Wetland soils, genesis, hydrology, landscapes, and classification. CRC Press LLC, Boca Raton, FLGoogle Scholar
  34. Vepraskas MJ, Faulkner SP (2001) Redox chemistry of hydric soils. In: Richardson JL, Vepraskas MJ (eds) Wetland soils, genesis, hydrology, landscapes, and classification. CRC Press LLC, Boca Raton, FLGoogle Scholar
  35. Vogt JV, Somma F (2000) Drought and drought mitigation in Europe. Advances in natural and technological hazards research. Kluwer, Dordrecht, The NetherlandsGoogle Scholar
  36. Vujasinović B (1971) Savjetovanje o Posavini. Poljoprivredni Fakultet, ZagrebGoogle Scholar
  37. Wenger EL, Zinke A, Gutzweiler KA (2004) Present situation of the European floodplain forests. For Ecol Manag 33–34:5–12Google Scholar
  38. Zaninović K, Gajić-Čapka M (2000) Changes in components of the water balance in the Croatian Lowlands. Theor Appl Clim 65(1–2):111–117Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Croatian Forest Research InstituteZagrebCroatia
  2. 2.Croatian Forest Research InstituteJastrebarskoCoatia
  3. 3.Department of Silviculture, Faculty of ForestryUniversity of ZagrebZagrebCoatia

Personalised recommendations