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Social Justice, Charity and Tax Evasion: A Critical Inquiry

  • Mark J. CherryEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 110)

Abstract

Through many conversations, in several countries, multiple states, and on at least two continents, Joseph Boyle has with great generosity and philosophical clarity taught me natural law theory. It is an honor to contribute to this volume. More importantly, the opportunity to grapple with his arguments is always rewarding. His defense of the new natural law theory is inevitably forceful and often almost convincing.

Keywords

Moral Obligation Plan Parenthood Moral Authority Moral Diversity Political Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.St. Edward’s UniversityAustinUSA

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