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Participating in Classroom Mathematical Practices

  • Paul CobbEmail author
  • Michelle Stephan
  • Kay McClain
  • Koeno Gravemeijer
Chapter
Part of the Mathematics Education Library book series (MELI, volume 48)

Abstract

In this article, we describe a methodology for analyzing the collective learning of the classroom community in terms of the evolution of classroom mathematical practices. To develop the rationale for this approach, we first ground the discussion in our work as mathematics educators who conduct classroom-based design research. We then present a sample analysis taken from a 1st-grade classroom teaching experiment that focused on linear measurement to illustrate how we coordinate a social perspective on communal practices with a psychological perspective on individual students’ diverse ways of reasoning as they participate in those practices. In the concluding sections of the article, we frame the sample analysis as a paradigm case in which to clarify aspects of the methodology and consider its usefulness for design research.

Keywords

Classroom mathematical practices Design research cycle Hypothetical learning trajectory Interpretive framework Linear measurement 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The analysis we report was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant REC 9814898 and by the Office of Educational Research and Improvement under Grant R305A60007.

We are grateful to Sasha Barab, Joanna Kulikowkich, Geoffrey Saxe, and Michael Young for helpful comments on a previous draft of this article.

The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the views of either the Foundation or OERI.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Cobb
    • 1
    Email author
  • Michelle Stephan
    • 2
  • Kay McClain
    • 3
  • Koeno Gravemeijer
    • 4
  1. 1.Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  2. 2.Lawton Chiles Middle SchoolOviedoUSA
  3. 3.Madison School DistrictPhoenixUSA
  4. 4.Eindhoven University of TechnologyEindhovenThe Netherlands

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