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Introduction

  • Paul CobbEmail author
  • Michelle Stephan
  • Janet Bowers
Chapter
  • 1.4k Downloads
Part of the Mathematics Education Library book series (MELI, volume 48)

Abstract

The notion of a classroom mathematical practice was introduced in the reprinted chapter in the last part. It is fair to say in retrospect that my initial use of this construct was largely intuitive: I had not defined a classroom mathematical practice with any precision or clarified how other researchers might identify the mathematical practices interactively constituted by the teacher and students in other classrooms. The primary goal of the chapter reprinted in this part was to overcome some of these limitations. The process of attempting to explicate and refine this notion was lengthy and occurred as Janet Bowers and Michelle Stephan conducted retrospective analyses of two classroom design experiments for their dissertation studies (Bowers, 1996; Stephan, 1998). A report of Bowers’ analysis was subsequently published in Cognition and Instruction (Bowers, Cobb, & McClain, 1999) and a revised version of Stephan’s dissertation was published as a Journal for Research in Mathematics Education monograph (Stephan, Bowers, & Cobb, 2003). The chapter reprinted here framed part of Stephan’s dissertation analysis as a case in which to explicate the process of analyzing the collective mathematical learning of a classroom community.

Keywords

Mathematical Learning Mathematical Reasoning Mathematical Practice Classroom Community Learning Trajectory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  2. 2.Lawton Chiles Middle SchoolOviedoUSA
  3. 3.Department of Mathematics and StatisticsSan Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA

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