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Introduction

  • Paul CobbEmail author
  • Lynn Liao Hodge
  • Melissa Gresalfi
Chapter
  • 1.3k Downloads
Part of the Mathematics Education Library book series (MELI, volume 48)

Abstract

Supporters of US current reform recommendations argue that the classroom instructional practices they advocate are more equitable than traditional instructional practices in giving all students access to significant mathematical ideas. The approach to instructional design outlined in the previous part of this book is broadly compatible with the influential set of reform recommendations proposed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (2000). The arguments of professional organizations such as NCTM not withstanding, I nonetheless took the view that reform advocates’ claims about equity should be scrutinized carefully. My doubts stemmed from prior work with groups elementary teachers in two different school districts in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The first of these districts was rural/suburban, whereas the second served an almost exclusively inner-city student population. Erna Yackel, Terry Wood, and I collaborated with teachers in first district for several years. Our overall goal was to help these teachers reorganize their classroom instructional practices in ways consistent with reform recommendations. To this end, we formulated an initial approach to teacher professional development while working with teachers at this site that proved to be reasonably effective (Cobb, Wood, & Yackel, 1990).

Keywords

Mathematics Education Instructional Design Mathematics Classroom Instructional Practice Teacher Professional Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  2. 2.University of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA
  3. 3.Indiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

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