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The Demography of Europe: Introduction

  • Gerda Neyer
  • Gunnar Andersson
  • Hill Kulu
Chapter

Abstract

Over the past decades Europe has witnessed fundamental changes of its population dynamics and population structure. These changes pose major challenges to population studies, as conventional theoretical assumptions regarding demographic behavior and demographic development seem unfit to provide convincing explanations of the recent demographic changes. This book, derived from the symposium on “The Demography of Europe” held at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany, in 2007 in honor of Professor Jan M. Hoem, brings together leading population researchers in the area of fertility, family, migration, life expectancy, and mortality. The contributions present key issues of the new Demography of Europe and discuss research advances to understand the continent’s demographic development at the turn of the 21st century.

Keywords

Life Expectancy Total Fertility Rate Labor Migration Return Migrant Occupational Mobility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Post-Retirement Publications of Jan Hoem

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyStockholm UniversityStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Department of GeographyUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK

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