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Care: A Critique of the Ethics and Emotion of Care

  • Barbara MaierEmail author
  • Warren A. Shibles†
Chapter
Part of the International Library of Ethics, Law, and the New Medicine book series (LIME, volume 47)

Abstract

This chapter aims at the clarification of the notion of care on the basis of the cognitive-emotive theory of caring. Care theories are presented and critiqued. Bonding is analyzed. Empathy, sympathy and helper’s syndrome are examined. A philosophy of caring is presented rather than only morals of caring. An analysis of caring is seen to require an analysis of ethics, the self, causes of action, motivation, and emotion. It is also shown how caring may be redefined and based on a naturalistic, humanistic theory of ethics. Philosophy and ethics of personality involve the emotion of care towards the humanistic concept of rational care.

Keywords

Care caring care theories bonding care as emotion rational caring The Patient’s Hippocratic Oath empathy humanism Philosophy and Ethics of Personality 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Gynecology and ObstetricsParacelsus Medical University SALKSalzburgAustria
  2. 2.University of Wisconsin–WhitewaterWhitewaterUSA

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