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Medicotheology and Biotheology

  • Barbara MaierEmail author
  • Warren A. Shibles†
Chapter
Part of the International Library of Ethics, Law, and the New Medicine book series (LIME, volume 47)

Abstract

Religion is the major guiding belief system of nearly every culture and almost defines culture itself. Medicine is largely influenced by such beliefs. If one follows one’s religion, one is thought to be moral, if not, not. It may be noted that religion is morals, not ethics. Ethics in medicine would refer to a rational, holistic consequentialism. On this view, a religious or non-religious, supernaturalistic belief, which does not consider consequences and defeats naturalistic goals and wants, such as e.g. medical research, is unethical. It may support a religion, but does not qualify as an ethical system. This is a book on the philosophy of medicine, which therefore must involve some philosophy of religion. As such, it is a critical examination of some of the concepts and methods in each area e.g. a critique of the sanctity-of-life doctrine as well as a critique of prayer as medical treatment.

Keywords

Religion religious beliefs philosophy of religion humanism consequentialism sanctity-of-life doctrine quality of life criteria medicotheology biotheology prayer 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Gynecology and ObstetricsParacelsus Medical University SALKSalzburgAustria
  2. 2.University of Wisconsin–WhitewaterWhitewaterUSA

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