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A Critique of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM): Evidence-Based Medicine and Philosophy-Based Medicine

  • Barbara MaierEmail author
  • Warren A. Shibles†
Chapter
Part of the International Library of Ethics, Law, and the New Medicine book series (LIME, volume 47)

Abstract

The critique of EBM is not meant to discard EBM in general, rather to challenge its shortcomings and to support its positive intentions by introducing a philosophy of evidence, and providing a constructive critique of the concept, methods, and its findings. The EBM research studies are based largely on complex mathematical and statistical data and data analysis. Statistics do not give clinical results, but only statistical results. When we quantify we typically remove all of the qualities from the individual. Evidence answers the question of how we know something. We need philosophical analysis to determine what evidence is. This is philosophical evidence-based medicine. The problem of placebo in EBM is not resolved yet. Placebo is defined in this chapter as the positive assessments and emotions one has, and these do have a bodily effect.

Keywords

Evidence-based medicine (EBM) philosophy of EBM evidence – definition EBM as statistics clinical experience confounding factors rational medicine placebo as emotion nocebo as emotion philosophy of medicine-based medicine 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Gynecology and ObstetricsParacelsus Medical University SALKSalzburgAustria
  2. 2.University of Wisconsin–WhitewaterWhitewaterUSA

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