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Ethics Counseling: Philosophy of Medicine Counseling Instead of Medical Ethics Counseling

  • Barbara MaierEmail author
  • Warren A. Shibles†
Chapter
Part of the International Library of Ethics, Law, and the New Medicine book series (LIME, volume 47)

Abstract

The philosophy of medicine is a critique of the concepts and methods of medicine. Ethics Committee often only represent the enculturated views of its members, often only reflect the morals of a society. Who would qualify to be on such a committee and what should be the requirements? This is not at all clear, not even dealt with. Medical ethics counseling is not enough when only dealing with certain bioethics directions like principlism, Kantian deontology, situational ethics, case method, etc. Philosophy of medicine counseling is asked for when dealing in depth with the theory and practice of medicine and bioethics.

Keywords

Philosophy philosophical counselling Philosophical Practice ethics committees consensus ethics counseling (EC) Humanism philosophy of medicine counseling philosophy practitioner emotion 

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© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Gynecology and ObstetricsParacelsus Medical University SALKSalzburgAustria
  2. 2.University of Wisconsin–WhitewaterWhitewaterUSA

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