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A History of Visualization in Psychology and Science

  • Linda M. PhillipsEmail author
  • Stephen P. Norris
  • John S. Macnab
Chapter
Part of the Models and Modeling in Science Education book series (MMSE, volume 5)

Abstract

Visualization as a psychological phenomenon has been studied for little more than a century. Nineteenth century studies opened the important and interesting question of whether visual thinking involves a reproduction of the object of the visualization or whether it is something else altogether. Despite considerable progress in psychological understanding of the mechanisms of visual perception and visual thinking, that question and others are still open. In what follows, we try to show where the main issues lie.

Keywords

Mental Image Mental Imagery Visual Imagery Cognition Model Visual Percept 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda M. Phillips
    • 1
    Email author
  • Stephen P. Norris
    • 2
  • John S. Macnab
    • 3
  1. 1.Canadian Centre for Research on LiteracyUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Centre for Research in Youth, Science Teaching and LearningUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  3. 3.EdmontonCanada

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