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Estimation of the Spatial Variation of Water Quality by Neural Models and Surface Algorithms

  • Mrinmoy MajumderEmail author
  • Suchita Dutta
  • Bipal K. Jana
  • Rabindra Nath Barman
  • Pankaj Roy
  • Asis Mazumdar
Chapter
  • 1.2k Downloads

Abstract

The present study was a continuation of the scientific investigation described in Chapter 9. The present research tried to estimate spatial variation of water quality, expressed by Weighted Average Water Quality (WAWQ), from the estimated spatial variation of stream flow as explained in Chapter 9. The relationship between WAWQ and stream flow was estimated with the help of neurogenetic models, and the spatial variation was predicted by radial basis surface algorithm. According to the results, upstream of Damodar River was found to have low quality of water than the upstream of river Barakar, downstream of river Damodar, and the entire river networks of Rupnarayan. But in the future, quality of river water will be estimated to degrade with time for both the scenarios of climate change, which was depicted by the surface diagrams of the future, where area of low WAWQ circles were seemed to be increased with time from 2010 to 2100. The change was more or less similar for both A2 and B2 scenario of climate change.

Keywords

Water quality neuro-genetic models spatial variation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mrinmoy Majumder
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Suchita Dutta
    • 2
  • Bipal K. Jana
    • 1
    • 3
  • Rabindra Nath Barman
    • 1
    • 4
  • Pankaj Roy
    • 1
  • Asis Mazumdar
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Water Resources EngineeringJadavpur UniversityKolkataIndia
  2. 2.Regional Center, National Afforestation and Eco-development BoardJadavpur UniversityKolkataIndia
  3. 3.Consulting Engineering ServicesWest BengalIndia
  4. 4.Department of ProductionNational Institute of TechnologyAgartalaIndia

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