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Cardiovascular Response and Adaptation to Exercise

  • J. H. Mitchell

Abstract

Exercise can be classified into two broad categories according to mechanical activity and these are dynamic or isotonic and static or isometric. In dynamic exercise there are changes in muscle length and movements in joints caused by rhythmic muscle contractions which develop little tension. In static exercise there is a relatively large generation of muscle tension caused by contractions with little or no change in muscle length and little or no movement in joints. Physical activities such as long distance running or cross-country skiing (classic technique) are pure dynamic exercise and weight-lifting or water-skiing are pure static exercise. However, these two types of activity should be thought of as the two opposite poles of a continuum in which most physical activity has components of both static and dynamic exercise. For example, rowing and speed skating involve both dynamic and static exercise.

Keywords

Maximal Voluntary Contraction Endurance Training Cardiovascular Response Maximal Oxygen Uptake Static Exercise 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Readings

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    Mitchell JH and Raven PB (1994) Cardiovascular response and adaptation to exercise. In: Physical Activity, Fitness and Health: International Consensus Statement, Bouchard C, Shephard R and Stephens T (Eds), Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics Publishers, pp 286–298Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. H. Mitchell
    • 1
  1. 1.Harry S. Moss Heart CenterUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical CenterDallasUSA

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