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The Therapeutic Strategy

  • A. Cesarani
  • D. Alpini
Conference paper

Abstract

Training focused on the primary functional problems and secondary adaptive strategies of the individual can have positive effects on postural stability in postwhiplash vertigo and dizziness. The most effective training program, however, incorporates all the information from the patient’s history, physical examination, clinical and instrumental test results.

Keywords

Purkinje Cell Cerebellar Cortex Smooth Pursuit Vestibular Nucleus Mossy Fiber 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Cesarani
    • 1
  • D. Alpini
    • 2
  1. 1.Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Istituto di AudiologiaUniversità degli Studi di MilanoMilanItaly
  2. 2.ENT, Otoneurological Service Scientific Institute S. Maria N.te, F.ne don GnocchiMilanItaly

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