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Cellular Phones and Pacemakers: How Do They Interact?

  • M. Santomauro
  • A. Amendolara
  • A. Costanzo
  • M. Damiano
  • P. Nocerino
  • F. Russo
  • M. Amendolara
  • M. Chiariello

Abstract

Non-ionizing radiation is emitted by different types of equipment such as microwave ovens, high-voltage electrical lines, cellular phones, etc. This kind of radiation (electromagnetic waves) can also cause interference. Many electronic medical devices such as pacemakers (PM) can malfunction as a consequence of electromagnetic interference (EMI) [1–5].

Keywords

Cellular Phone Time Division Multiple Access Anechoic Chamber Electromagnetic Compatibility Antenna Generation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Santomauro
    • 1
  • A. Amendolara
    • 2
  • A. Costanzo
    • 1
  • M. Damiano
    • 1
  • P. Nocerino
    • 1
  • F. Russo
    • 1
  • M. Amendolara
    • 2
  • M. Chiariello
    • 1
  1. 1.Reparto di Cardiologia e CardiochirurgiaUniversità Federico IINaplesItaly
  2. 2.Ansaldo Trasporti S.p.A. Centro RicercheNaplesItaly

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