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Risk Stratification after Acute Myocardial Infarction: What Is the Usefulness of Programmed Ventricular Stimulation?

  • M. Zoni-Berisso
  • D. Silvestri

Abstract

In the first year following acute myocardial infarction (AMI), sudden death, generally due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias [1, 2], and spontaneous sustained ventricular tachycardia (SVT) occur in 3%–5% of patients discharged from the hospital. In addition, in this setting, sudden death represents approximately one half of all cardiac deaths [3–5]. Therefore, it is evident that an early and accurate identification of patients at risk of such arrhythmic events is highly desirable. This capability would allow therapeutic intervention to be limited to selected patients only.

Keywords

Acute Myocardial Infarction Acute Myocardial Infarction Ventricular Tachyarrhythmia Arrhythmic Event Ventricular Stimulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Zoni-Berisso
    • 1
  • D. Silvestri
    • 1
  1. 1.Divisione di CardiologiaE.O. Ospedali GallieraGenoaItaly

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