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Fast-Track Anesthesia in Cardiac Surgery and Postoperative Care

  • J. O. C. AulerJr.
  • M. J. C. Carmona
Conference paper

Abstract

The anesthetic objectives for a patient scheduled for cardiac surgery are the provision of an adequate depth of anesthesia with a fine balance of myocardial oxygen supply and demand, thus avoiding ischemia.

Keywords

Intensive Care Unit Stay Intrathecal Morphine Coronary Artery Surgery Thoracic Epidural Analgesia Anesthesia Technique 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. O. C. AulerJr.
  • M. J. C. Carmona

There are no affiliations available

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