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Continuous Flow Systems

  • R. Brandolese
  • G. Gritti
Conference paper

Abstract

There are many experimental and clinical works providing a great evidence that respiratory muscles fatigue is a major cause of the ventilatory pump failure, and that mechanical ventilation should be instituted not only to restore the compromised gas exchange, but also, to unload the respiratory fatigued muscles [1].

Keywords

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Respiratory Muscle Functional Residual Capacity Pressure Support Ventilation Inspiratory Muscle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia, Milano 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Brandolese
  • G. Gritti

There are no affiliations available

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