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Asthma: Origin, Mechanisms, and Clinical Aspects

  • I. Ziment

Abstract

Although asthma responds to therapy directed at changes in the airways of the bronchial tree, the cause of the asthmatic response may lie elsewhere. Thus, treatment may need to be directed at the specific causative factor and at any organ or tissue that is primarily responsible. It is not possible to provide an accurate breakdown of the frequency with which other sites are etiologically involved, but in a large proportion of asthmatic patients infectious disorders in the upper respiratory tract appear to initiate the bronchospastic reaction. A relatively small proportion of cases of asthma are attributable as secondary reactions to primary diseases located in various organs of the body, including the lungs themselves.

Keywords

Allergic Rhinitis Nasal Polyp Asthmatic Response Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis Upper Airway 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Ziment
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, Olive View Medical CenterUCLA School of MedicineSylmarUSA

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