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Bone Marrow Changes in Various Hematological Diseases

  • G. Benz-Bohm
  • H. Kugel
  • D. Schwamborn
Conference paper
Part of the Syllabus book series (SYLLABUS)

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has an excellent spatial and contrast resolution. It is able to separate hematopoietic from fatty marrow and analyse quantitatively the two major marrow components, fat and water. Therefore, it is a highly sensitive technique for evaluation of bone marrow in children.

Keywords

Sickle Cell Anemia Polycythemia Vera Magn Reson Image Normal Bone Marrow Fatty Marrow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia, Milano 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Benz-Bohm
    • 1
  • H. Kugel
    • 1
  • D. Schwamborn
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyUniversity of CologneCologneGermany
  2. 2.Children’s HospitalUniversity of CologneCologneGermany

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