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Observations from the Natural History Cohort of London, Ontario

  • G. Rice
  • M. Kremenchutzky
  • D. Cottrell
  • J. Baskerville
  • G. Ebers
Part of the Topics in Neuroscience book series (TOPNEURO)

Abstract

Charcot recognized that a subset of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) appeared to worsen in an insidiously progressive manner from the onset of the disease [1]. This clinically defined disease course has been called primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). There has been a tendency to consider this disease phenotype different from that of patients whose disease course is characterized by attacks, either relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or the late progressive phase of that condition, known as secondary progressive MS (SPMS) (Fig. 1). In contrast to RRMS, comparatively little information is available on the clinical and demographic features and the natural history of PPMS [2–5]. Prognostic variables have yet to be addressed specifically and the natural history has been less well charted.

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis SPMS Patient Multiple Sclerosis Incidence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia, Milano 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Rice
  • M. Kremenchutzky
  • D. Cottrell
  • J. Baskerville
  • G. Ebers

There are no affiliations available

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