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Sepsis and Organ Dysfunction — Basics, Controversies, Rationale

  • A. E. Baue
Conference paper

Abstract

Sepsis is not a disease or even a syndrome. For most of us, it indicates an underlying infection that has caused an inflammatory response with systemic manifestations. For some, sepsis indicates a systemic inflammatory response no matter what its cause. Both an infection with an inflammatory response that is no longer localized, as with an abscess or a severe inflammatory problem perse, can produce remote organ dysfunction. This led to the concept of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and to multiple organ failure (MOF) [1–5]. Some still believe that the inflammatory response should be called a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). The usefulness of this expression has been questioned.

Keywords

Organ Dysfunction Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Multiple Organ Failure Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome Magic Bullet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia, Milano 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. E. Baue

There are no affiliations available

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