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Lymphocyte subsets in multiple sclerosis cerebrospinal fluid

  • M. G. Marrosu
Conference paper

Abstract

The study of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cells in multiple sclerosis (MS) has been closely linked to progress in the field of general immunology. In the mid-70s, with the advent of the idea that MS was an immunologically-mediated disease (or, at least, that an immunological process was at the basis of its pathogenesis), there was a sudden fluorishing of research on CSF cells. In those years, immunological methods used to distinguish B from T lymphocytes were applied to CSF cells, in order to establish the relative percentage of T and B lymphocyte subsets. The challenge was to find some numerical or functional abnormality to explain the high production of IgG in MS CSF.

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Cerebrospinal Fluid Optic Neuritis Lymphocyte Subset Aseptic Meningitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia, Milano 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. G. Marrosu
    • 1
  1. 1.II Chair of Paediatric Neuropsychiatry, Department of NeuroscienceUniversity of CagliariCagliariItaly

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