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Transcutaneous Oxymetry

  • G. Oriani
  • P. Campagnoli
  • C. Longoni
  • A. J. van der Kleij
  • D. J. Bakker
  • D. Mathieu
  • R. Nevière
  • F. Wattel

Abstract

The use of measuring transcutaneous oxymetry during treatments of hyperbaric oxygen therapy has proved to be a valid method in controlling the quality of each treatment and for the prognosis of each patient. Conceived as a substitute means of measuring PaO2 in newborn babies in a completely noninvasive way, this method has been successfully applied in the field of hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

Keywords

Oxygen Pressure Hyperbaric Oxygen Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Transcutaneous Oxygen Crush Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia, Milano 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Oriani
    • 1
  • P. Campagnoli
    • 1
  • C. Longoni
    • 2
  • A. J. van der Kleij
    • 3
  • D. J. Bakker
    • 3
  • D. Mathieu
    • 4
  • R. Nevière
    • 4
  • F. Wattel
    • 4
  1. 1.Anaesthesia, Intensive and Hyperbaric Care DepartmentGaleazzi Orthopaedic InstituteMilanItaly
  2. 2.Anaesthesia and Reanimation ServicePol. San MarcoZingonia (BG)Italy
  3. 3.Departement of Surgery (Hyperbaric Medicine)University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical CenterAmsterdam Z. O.The Netherlands
  4. 4.Service d’Urgences Respiratoires, de Réanimation et Médecine HyperbareHôpital A. Calmette, Centre Hospitalier Régional UniversitaireLille CedexFrance

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