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High Resolution Studies of Oxygen, Carbogen and Carbon Dioxide in the Brain — with Supporting Findings from Peripheral Muscle

  • I. R. Young
  • J. V. Hajnal
  • A. Oatridge
  • J. A. Wilson
  • G. M. Bydder
Conference paper
Part of the Syllabus book series (SYLLABUS)

Abstract

This article reviews a number of experiments in which volunteers inhaled air, oxygen, carbon dioxide (5%) in air, and carbogen (5% carbon dioxide, 95% oxygen). Most of the experiments described used the registration methods described elsewhere in this Syllabus (MRI Using True 3D Sequences and Full Positional Registration, JV Hajnal et al.) and the reader is referred there for descriptions of the methodology. Following the investigations of the effects of the inhaled gases on the brain and its surrounds, we discuss briefly experiments on volunteer calf muscle, in which we produced extreme depletion in tissue oxygenation, (going far beyond anything that could normally be tolerated in the brain), in order to try to understand the development of signals such as those attributed to the BOLD (blood oxygenation level dependent) effect [1, 2].

Keywords

Near Infrared Spectroscopy Gado Pentetate Dimeglumine Blood Oxygenation Level Peripheral Muscle High Resolution Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia, Milano 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. R. Young
    • 1
  • J. V. Hajnal
    • 1
  • A. Oatridge
    • 1
  • J. A. Wilson
    • 1
  • G. M. Bydder
    • 1
  1. 1.Robert Steiner Magnetic Resonance UnitHammersmith HospitalLondonUK

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