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Functional MRI pp 111-114 | Cite as

Clinical Diffusion Imaging on a Standard MR System: Diagnostic Usefulness Compared with Conventional MRI

  • P. Reimer
  • G. Schuierer
  • M. Deimling
  • E. Müller
  • P. E. Peters
Conference paper
Part of the Syllabus book series (SYLLABUS)

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the ability to show and measure molecular diffusion. Molecular diffusion is the result of the thermal (Brownian) random translational motion involving all molecules. The interest in molecular diffusion is motivated by potential new approaches to characterize lesions based on their molecular mobility such as in the evaluation of stroke. There has been some controversy whether MRI could measure microscopic effects within a macroscopically moving environment and reports have been restricted to dedicated scanners or coils. The clinical breakthrough of diffusion MRI has been delayed by many problems encountered with the implementation of diffusion MRI on clinical scanners [1]. Clinical diffusion MRI requires careful selection of hardware and a variety of technical parameters. The purpose of our work is to evaluate the clinical value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with brain tumors and infarcts using a commercially available scanner.

Keywords

Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Spin Echo Diffusion Imaging Gadopentetate Dimeglumine Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia, Milano 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Reimer
    • 1
  • G. Schuierer
    • 1
  • M. Deimling
    • 2
  • E. Müller
    • 2
  • P. E. Peters
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Clinical RadiologyWestfalian Wilhelms-UniversityMuensterGermany
  2. 2.Siemens AGErlangerGermany

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