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Nursing the dying in intensive care

  • J. Seymour
Conference paper

Abstract

While at first sight being at opposite ends of a spectrum, closer inspection of intensive care and palliative care reveals many similarities. Both specialities developed during a similar time period and care for patients and their families at moments of extreme vulnerability and need. Staff in both must face death frequently and repeatedly manage its consequences for patients, families and themselves. In so doing, both specialities rely on models of specialist nursing care in which the ‘total’ care of patients and their families is paramount and in which recognition of the interdependence of medicine and nursing and the importance of team work is highly developed.

Keywords

Intensive Care Unit Palliative Care Emotional Exhaustion Intensive Care Nurse Extreme Vulnerability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia, Milano 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Seymour

There are no affiliations available

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