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Growth Hormone Secretion in Thalassemic Patients

  • M. Caruso-Nicoletti
  • G. Tinnirello
  • V. Panebianco
  • M. Mancuso
  • G. Spadaro
  • D. Lo Presti
  • F. Di Gregorio

Abstract

During the past 10 years significant achievements have been made in the treatment of p–thalassemia major. Nevertheless, the improved survival of these patients has led to the appearance of several complications, which now represent the major clinical problems in the disease. Endocrine disorders are very common, and growth failure is one of the most frequent. Short stature is present in approximately 30% of our thalassemic patients (n = 200). However, the pathogenesis of the growth disturbances of thalassemic patients has not yet been elucidated. The role of growth hormone (GH) deficiency in the growth impairment of these patients is controversial. Hence, we have studied GH secretion in a group of thalassemic patients with short stature.

Keywords

Short Stature Standard Deviation Score Thalassemic Patient Thalassemia Major Transfusion Regimen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Caruso-Nicoletti
  • G. Tinnirello
  • V. Panebianco
  • M. Mancuso
  • G. Spadaro
  • D. Lo Presti
  • F. Di Gregorio

There are no affiliations available

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