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Clinical and Paraclinical Outcomes for Treatment Trials in Multiple Sclerosis

  • G. Comi
  • M. Rovaris
Conference paper
Part of the Topics in Neuroscience book series (TOPNEURO)

Abstract

Testing the efficacy of treatments potentially able to modify the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is more than an issue, as the natural history of this disease is quite variable from patient to patient and in the same patient from time to time [1]. In about 85% of patients, the disease begins with an acute attack, followed by a partial or complete remission. In few cases (2%–4%), the acute attack is followed by a progressive course, with or without plateaus (the so-called transitional form). Most patients enter a relapsing-remitting course, during which they may accumulate some impairment or disability due to the incomplete recovery from relapses. After 10 years, about 50% of these patients enter the progressive course (secondary progressive MS), with or without superimposed relapses; this figure raises to about 80% after 20 years of disease [2-4]. About 15% of the patients have a progressive course from the onset of the disease, without relapses (primary progressive MS) or with superimposed relapses (progressive relapsing MS) [1].

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Expand Disability Status Scale Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Optic Neuritis Evoke Potential 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Comi
    • 1
  • M. Rovaris
    • 2
  1. 1.Clinical Trials Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Scientific Institute Ospedale San RaffaeleUniversity of MilanItaly
  2. 2.Neuroimaging Research Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Scientific Institute Ospedale San RaffaeleUniversity of MilanItaly

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