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A pre-hospital pharmacological review

  • G. Trillò
  • G. Berlot
Part of the Topics in Anaesthesia and Critical Care book series (TIACC)

Abstract

The mortality for trauma is still dramatically high despite the continuous developments in the organisation of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS), of emergency departments, and the continuous efforts in the research field relating to this matter. A good paper by Trunkey showed a trimodal distribution of deaths from traumatic injury, the first peak being the nonsurvivable injuries, and the second occurring within the first few hours from the event, and that are due mostly to cerebral injury and haemorrhage [1]. Our resuscitative efforts in the pre-hospital setting are focused on reducing this second peak of mortality, and the use of an appropriate pharmacological approach may help us in this task.

Keywords

Emergency Medical Service Malignant Hyperthermia Severe Head Injury Helicopter Emergency Medical Service Acute Spinal Cord Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Trillò
  • G. Berlot

There are no affiliations available

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